Fall/Winter Kayak Fishing La Jolla 2015

The volume of pelagic red crab along the coast continue to slow the fishing on many days, and the water temp is hanging in the 64-65 degree range.

Recent disappearance of the exotics from the local scene has most people concentrating on rock fishing, which will close on January 1 for a couple of months.

I shot some video recently showing the December crab invasion. That being said, November and December did provide some great days for kayak rock fishing where I managed some great rockfish catches.

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Summer Kayak Fishing La Jolla

The huge influx of Red Crab has been all over the news lately and the local waters are getting warm reading around 68 – 70 at TPO buoy today.  Following the crab up from Mexico are big schools of yellowtail and both bluefin and yellowfin tuna. The tuna have been seen a few miles off the coast feeding at times, but the bite is a ‘slow pick’ at best.

A couple days out on the water on my kayak have proven that this is a ‘different year’. Targeting yellowtail seems to be working near the canyon, and some seabass have made the occasional appearance.  I will adjust the game plan and maybe see some exotics through the summer and fall.

And, maybe we will get the predicted El Nino and some much needed rainfall this winter.

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Winter Kayak Fishing dilemma – Salt or Fresh?

In October and November, I was focused on getting shallow water lobster – very shallow. The end of December and through January showed a good bite on yellowtail (yo-yo iron), and the Grey Whales were all over La Jolla. There are still some bonito around as well. When the swell is up on the salt, I have had some luck with early crappie bites in January, and looks like Otay is picking up already this year.

Summer’s in full swing! Yellowtail on the chew!

This is a warm water year, with water temps in the 70 – 73+ range in La Jolla and the Southern California offshore banks.  The ‘offshore’ scene here off SanDiego is on FIRE with yellowtail, yellowfin tuna, and bluefin tuna fishing as good as it ever gets.  This fact keeps the boat pressure off of the La Jolla area, and the kelp line yellowtail bite has been excellent, with the local 1/2 day boat averaging a dozen nice yellowtail per trip, and kayakers getting their share!

The fish have been located outside the bull kelp areas of South La Jolla and that structure gives them a healthy advantage when hooked.  Be sure to be prepared with your kelp cutter rigs (heavy tackle with spectra/braid) and tight drags to get these fish to the kayak.  Along with the yellows are the three B’s – barracuda and bonito and bass. Go get some!

 

Spring Kayak Fishing in Southern California

Targets: White Seabass, Halibut, Yellowtail, Lingcod and Rockfish

Rockfish season is OPEN in San Diego on March 1!  Spring in Southern California has me watching the weather forecasts and water temperatures closely, and getting out to the kelp beds when conditions permit. See the Kayak Conditions link in the menu bar.

Its an exciting time of year as many types of fish spawn in this season, and the pre-spawn warming water temps trigger their feeding to fatten up.  Large schools of white seabass can hang in the kelpbeds during the day during springtime.

Need some motivation?  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HKdOpniNsSU

With the seabass, many other fish that spend the winter in deeper water (100 – 200+’) will come into the kelp bed areas in 30 – 90′ to take advantage of the abundant schools of grunion, smelt, anchovies, sardines, and other baitfish.  This includes calico bass, lingcod and big halibut.

Check out my Photo Album link in the menu bar.

When the water temperature steadies around 62-63 degrees, the bass fishing can be excellent.  For La Jolla, see this page for temps:  http://cdip.ucsd.edu/?nav=recent&sub=observed&units=english&tz=PDT&pub=public&stn=100&xitem=temperature

 

Fall and Winter Lobster / Yellowtail / Halibut / Rockfish

Cooling water temps in late Fall will have many fish moving to, and concentrating in deeper water along with the schools of baitfish and squid they feed upon.

Rockfish can become very active in cooler water, and finding areas with structure deeper than 120 feet deep with good current will increase your catch rate. Remember that currents coming UP from deeper water serve as a food source ‘conveyor belt’ getting the rockfish in a feeding mood!  Save the monotony of reeling up sanddabs and baby rockfish by using bigger baits and 7/0+ sized circle hooks.

I also enjoy catching lobster during these months using hoop nets.  With Rockfish closure for Jan-Feb, try halibut fishing in the 60 – 80 foot range, and concentrate on areas of known squid spawns.

Tight lines,

Larry

Spring Kayak Fishing

Calico Bass, Halibut, White Seabass, and Rockfish

Spring in Southern California has me watching the weather forecasts and water temperatures closely, and getting out to the kelp beds when conditions permit. Its an exciting time of year as many types of fish spawn in this season, and the pre-spawn warming water temps trigger their feeding to fatten up. Many fish that spend the winter in deeper water (100 – 200+’) will come into the kelp areas in 30 – 90′ to take advantage of the grunion, smelt, anchovies, sardines and other baitfish.

When the water temperature steadies around 62-63 degrees, the bass fishing can be excellent.  For La Jolla, see this page for temps http://cdip.ucsd.edu/?nav=recent&sub=observed&units=english&tz=PDT&pub=public&stn=100&xitem=temperature

My Kayaking Conditions page  http://www.larryl.com/favorite_kayak_conditions.htm

My Fishing Photos: http://s4.beta.photobucket.com/user/blackcloud9/library/Fishing

My Videos: http://s4.beta.photobucket.com/user/blackcloud9/library/Fishing/Fishing%20Videos